Steven Lynn Bernasek

Executive Vice President (Academic Affairs)

Professor Steven Lynn Bernasek was appointed Executive Vice President (Academic Affairs) on 1 May 2017. He oversees the academic and co-curricular aspects of the liberal arts experience at Yale-NUS College, including all faculty matters and academic affairs. Professor Bernasek is a Professor of Science (Chemistry) and was Dean of Faculty from July 2016 to May 2017 and Director of the Division of Science from July 2015 to July 2016.

Prior to joining Yale-NUS College, Professor Bernasek was a Professor of Chemistry at Princeton University. He received his undergraduate degree from Kansas State University and his PhD from the University of California, Berkeley. An experimental physical chemist, Professor Bernasek’s research interests are in the areas of surface chemistry and chemical physics. Professor Bernasek’s research focuses on the application of gas phase molecular reaction dynamics tools to the study of heterogeneous reactions and he has published over 200 papers in journals such as Journal of Chemical Physics, Journal of Physical Chemistry, Journal of the American Chemical Society and Surface Science. A fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, he has been a Research Fellow of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation and has received the American Chemical Society Arthur W. Adamson Award for Distinguished Service in the Advancement of Surface Chemistry.

Since joining Yale-NUS in July 2015 as Divisional Director of Science, Professor Bernasek has been involved in planning and annual review for the Science division and in the review of the Common Curriculum. As Dean of Faculty, he concentrated his efforts on strengthening the tenure process and increasing the number of tenured faculty. To enable faculty to better achieve their twin goals of research and undergraduate teaching, efforts are also underway to enhance the faculty support infrastructure, such as expanding opportunities for field studies and laboratory research, and increasing the library resources needed for faculty research.