Claudine Ang

Humanities (History)

Assistant Professor

Email: claudine.ang@yale-nus.edu.sg

Dr Claudine Ang’s interest in Southeast Asia was kindled at the National University of Singapore, where she received her BA (Hons) in 1999 from the Department of Southeast Asian Studies and an MA from the Department of History in 2005. Focusing on Vietnamese History, Southeast Asian History, and Modern Chinese History, she completed her doctoral studies in the Department of History at Cornell University (2012). Dr Ang’s dissertation, entitled Statecraft on the Margins: Drama, Poetry, and the Civilizing Mission in Eighteenth-Century Vietnam, was awarded the 2012 Lauriston Sharp Dissertation Prize. While at Cornell, Dr Ang received numerous fellowships and awards, including the Gertrude A Gilmore Fellowship from the Department of History, the Bluestone Peace Studies Fellowship from the Judith Reppy Institute of Peace and Conflict Studies, the CV Starr Graduate Fellowship from the East Asia Programme, and the Hsien Wu and Daisy Yen Wu Award.

Dr Ang’s research interests straddle the disciplines of literature and history, as well as the fields of East and Southeast Asia. She is particularly interested in the political uses of literature, including Vietnamese drama and Chinese landscape poetry, in the Mekong delta. She specialises in 18th- and 19th-century southern Vietnamese frontier history, and her research includes a critical study of a vernacular Vietnamese play written in the demotic Vietnamese script, which she has translated. Additionally, she has published on debates in 20th-century Vietnamese historiography in the Journal of Vietnamese Studies.

Dr Ang teaches in the Literature and Humanities Great Works sequence. Her course offerings span the regions of China and Southeast Asia, and include titles such as Chinese Migrations to Southeast Asia; History and Culture of Southeast Asia; Ming Imperial Voyages, 1405-1433; and Modern Vietnamese History and Literature. Prior to joining Yale-NUS College, Dr Ang designed and taught a First Year Writing Seminar, entitled Eunuchs, Castrati, and Involuntarily Castrated Men in History, for the John S Knight Institute for Writing in the Disciplines at Cornell University.